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10 result(s) displayed (1 - 10):

April 08, 2010

Foreclosure Houses

Foreclosure houses are appealing to first time home buyers and real estate investors because they can be purchased below market value. The majority of foreclosure properties sold through public auctions or lending institutions require repairs or renovations. However, most can be transformed into a great residence or investment property.

There are pros and cons to buying foreclosure houses. Individuals who have never purchased real estate through public auctions should take time to learn how the process works. Otherwise, bargain foreclosure properties can quickly turn into money pits.

Real Estate Investing article on "Foreclosure Houses"

February 22, 2010

Real Estate Short Sale

A real estate short sale is a type of agreement sometimes offered by mortgage lenders to borrowers who have fallen behind on home loan payments. In order to obtain short sale approval certain eligibility requirements must be met. While short selling offers financial relief to borrowers, it might not be the best strategy.

The real estate short sale process can take between three to six months to complete. The first step involves contacting the bank loss mitigation department. In addition to handling short sale real estate, loss mitigators also work with borrowers to obtain loan modifications, mortgage refinancing and deed in lieu of foreclosure transactions.

Real Estate Investing article on "Real Estate Short Sale"

February 19, 2010

Probate Properties

Probate properties refer to real estate owned by a person who is deceased. Probate refers to the legal process used to verify property ownership and determine rightful heirs. If probate real estate is bequeathed through the decedent's last will, real estate transfer documents must be filed through the court. If no Will exists, the court must adhere to probate laws to determine who is entitled to inherit the property.

Probate properties can be held in probate for several months. All expenses associated with the property must be paid by the estate until probate settles. Costs might include mortgage payments, property taxes, homeowners insurance, homeowner association dues, and maintenance expenses such as lawn care or repairs.

Real Estate Investing article on "Probate Properties "

January 04, 2010

Personal Representative

Personal representative refers to a person who manages the estate of a deceased person. Estate administrators are appointed within decedent's last will and testament. If no Will exists, personal representatives are appointed by a probate judge.

A personal representative usually requires legal assistance from a probate or estate planning lawyer. Estate settlement must adhere to state probate laws and involves submitting various documents to the court. Few people are prepared to undergo the process of probate alone.

Real Estate Investing article on "Personal Representative"

January 01, 2010

Mortgage Foreclosure

Mortgage foreclosure rates continue to rise in spite of President Obama's mortgage relief plan. Anticipated mortgage foreclosure statistics project an additional 9 million homeowner's will lose their homes to foreclosure by 2012.

The increase in mortgage foreclosure rates originated with predatory lending practices. Many borrowers obtained 'no money down' subprime loans. When the banking crisis occurred and real estate prices fell, many borrowers were left owing more on their home mortgage loan than the appraised property value.

Real Estate Investing article on "Mortgage Foreclosure"

November 30, 2009

Wholesaling

Wholesaling refers to a type of real estate transaction. Investors purchase properties at discounted prices and sell to another buyer for profit. Wholesaling is sometimes referred to as house flipping. When wholesalers flip houses they sell them in as-is condition and do not invest any money to rehab the property.

Wholesaling real estate can be a profitable business as long as investors have a solid team of realty professionals. Let's face it. The real estate market is a mess. Millions of Americans have lost their homes to foreclosure. Banks have engaged in short sales and have thousands of vacant properties in their portfolios. Neighborhoods are suffering the effects by paying higher homeowner association fees, property taxes and utilities.

Real Estate Investing article on "Wholesaling"

November 13, 2009

Deed in Lieu

Deed in lieu is an option presented to borrowers facing foreclosure. Deed in lieu agreements allow borrowers to return their house to the mortgage lender and walk away. Although homeowners' lose all vested monies and receive no sale proceeds they can avoid foreclosure and lessen credit damage.

Mortgage lenders are not required to offer deed in lieu agreements. However, banks benefit by this type of real estate transaction because it allows them to avoid the costly expense of foreclosure eviction.

Real Estate Investing article on "Deed in Lieu "

October 30, 2009

Warranty Deed

A warranty deed used with real estate transfers guarantees the property has a clean title with no liens attached. Liens are used when borrowers default on creditor loans, owe taxes to the Internal Revenue Service, or have outstanding child support or alimony payments. There are two types of real estate warranty deeds - General or Limited.

A general warranty deed guarantees the seller owns the real estate and has authority to sell it. General warranty deeds protect the buyer if the seller engages in non-disclosure. This might include not reporting creditor or tax liens or judgments not reported by the seller.

Real Estate Investing article on "Warranty Deed "

October 21, 2009

Seller Carry Back Trust Deeds

Seller carry back trust deeds are used when property owners provide financing to sellers. Also known as seller carry back financing, trust deeds secure the property until private financing has been repaid. Sellers can elect to carry all or a portion of real estate financing. This technique is often used when buyers are unable to obtain financing through a traditional lending source.

Three parties are involved when seller carry back trust deeds are used. These include the Trustor, Beneficiary and Trustee. The property owner or seller is referred to as the Trustor. The individual or entity that receives income from the mortgage note is referred to as the Beneficiary. Beneficiaries can be a private party or a lending institution such as a bank or credit union. The person who holds legal title to the real estate is referred to as the Trustee. Depending on the circumstances, the Trustor can also be the Trustee and Beneficiary.

Real Estate Investing article on "Seller Carry Back Trust Deeds"

October 17, 2009

FSBO

FSBO stands for "For Sale by Owner". Homeowners engage in FSBO for many reasons. One of the most common is to avoid paying realtor commissions. The average realty commission is 6-percent of the sale price. By eliminating the fee, sellers can reduce the asking price of their property.

Closing fees are still associated with FSBO properties. These can include surveys, appraisals, inspections, homeowners insurance, property taxes, and bank fees. Sellers should review their mortgage note to determine if prepayment penalties are imposed.

Real Estate Investing article on "FSBO"

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