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3 result(s) displayed (1 - 3):

July 02, 2012

What is Mortgagor vs Mortgagee

Mortgagor vs. mortgagee is a term that anyone planning to buy a house with bank funds needs to learn about. When people obtain home loans they mortgage the property by entering into a legal contract with the bank.

Mortgage notes identify the mortgagor vs. mortgagee, along with details of the loan including interest rates, installment amounts, and payment dates. Mortgages are secured with promissory notes that include mortgagors' signatures to verify they understand the terms of the agreement and will pay back borrowed funds.

Mortgagee refers to the individual or lending institution providing funds needed to buy real estate. The property is used as collateral and the Mortgagee places a lien against it until the note is paid in full.

Real Estate Investing article on "What is Mortgagor vs Mortgagee "

March 11, 2009

Deed of Trust

A deed of trust is a legal document used to secure interest in real estate. Some states use trust deeds instead of mortgages. Although these two documents are similar in nature there is one primary difference. With a deed of trust the lender retains the property title until the loan is paid in full. With a mortgage, the buyer holds the title while the lender is provided with a property lien.

Deed of trust mortgages involve three parties and include the borrower, lender and trustee. The borrower is provided with a mortgage loan through the lender and must designate the lender as beneficiary to the legal title. The trustee retains the property title throughout the duration of the loan.

Real Estate Investing article on "Deed of Trust"

November 25, 2007

Forclosures

Home forclosures are escalating across the entire nation, forcing people out of their homes and into bankruptcy. Florida has taken one of the hardest hits in foreclosures, with more than 20,000 filings in 2007. California and Texas are close behind, with forclosures reaching well over 10,000 in each state.

Foreclosures in Arizona have risen over 40 percent since last year and Colorado reports 1 out of every 345 households has filed forclosure or on the brink of filing. Vermont, Maine and the District of Columbia seem to be the only states immune from forclosures. However, experts predict foreclosure rates will rise in these states when adjustable-rate mortgages start escalating.

Real Estate Investing article on "Forclosures"